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Stan Payne is interviewed often and asked to comment in a variety of media, particularly regarding his expertise in the area of shipping and transportation, and port management. Below are some of the articles and interviews in magazine publications and on video.

 

Stan Payne Interviewed by Bloomberg

Stan Payne comments on “Savannah Surges as Mighty Gate for Imports on U.S. Growth” on Bloomberg

The Port of Savannah’s September imports climbed 21.7 percent compared with a 7 percent increase for New York, although New York still imported almost twice the cargo — 256,244 twenty-foot equivalent units compared to 125,113 at Savannah. The busiest U.S. port, Los Angeles, grew 9.6 percent last month and imports into Long Beach, the second-busiest, rose 4.3 percent.

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Few expect Savannah’s port to overtake New York anytime soon.

“It has been widely accepted and time-tested that ships will always move large cargo volumes through New York because of its massive consuming population,” Stan Payne, the former head of the Canaveral Port Authority in Florida and now a shipping consultant, said in an e-mail. “In the end, if Savannah does overtake New York and New Jersey, and it certainly is within the realm of reasonable possibility, then it will do so because of focus and a political and operating structure that provides it the control to turn that focus into results.”

A sister port in Brunswick, Georgia, about 70 miles south, handles mainly roll-on, roll-off traffic, including automobile exports. Brunswick also imports more Jaguars, Mercedes and Porsches than any port in the U.S. Together, the two ports contributed $32.4 billion to Georgia’s economy in 2011, or 7.8 percent of the total, according to the most recent University of Georgia study. They were responsible for 352,146 jobs, including 37,000 in Savannah’s home Chatham County.

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Stan Payne for JOC

Stan Payne comments on “US ports rethink strategy in effort to boost efficiency”

Stanley Payne, principal at Summit Strategic Partners and a former senior executive at the Virginia Port Authority and Canaveral Port Authority, told JOC.com readers in an August 2013 column, entitled “Port Wars: Past, Present and Future,” that the big ships controlled by powerful carrier alliances changed the price of admission to the load center competition. Ports must have deep harbors, larger and stronger terminals, super-post-Panamax cranes and efficient operating systems — all of which will most likely have to be paid for with port-generated revenue.

“Ports focused so much on competition that they failed to get their houses in order,” Payne said in an interview at the weekend. Los Angeles and Long Beach, which have been receiving regular calls by 13,000- to 14,000-TEU ships for three years now, focused on deep harbors and larger terminals. The Southern California ports have always charged compensatory rates, so they have the revenue to support these capital expenditures. However, because of latent inefficiencies in their operations that are now coming to light during cargo surges from mega-ships, the velocity in moving containers through the ports has hit what truckers and cargo interests believe is an all-time low.

Payne said the South Atlantic ports of Savannah and Charleston have the opposite problem. The landlord ports are widely regarded as the most efficient in the country, he said, but they are scrambling to deepen their harbors and expand their terminals to accommodate the big ships of almost 10,000-TEU capacity that carriers in 2013, again without notice, began operating through the Suez Canal to the East Coast.

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Stan Payne for JOC

Stan Payne comments on “End to Stockton service won’t halt US marine highway push”

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Maritime Administration’s latest push to promote coastal and inland waterway container services comes despite signs that such efforts are either a long shot or destined to fail.

Last week, the Port of Stockton, California, announced it would end its weekly container-on-barge service to and from the Port of Oakland on Sept. 1 because it only attracted half of the volume it was hoping for. The service — one of three regular U.S. container services via inland waterways — will still operate on an as-needed basis, said Richard Aschieris, Stockton’s port director.

While critics argue the demise of the regular service proves so-called marine highways can’t be competitive with surface modes such as trucking, the Maritime Administration said the service showed “that moving freight by water can benefit area businesses, alleviate highway congestion and improve air quality.”

In fact, Marad is calling for project applications that would expand on existing inland waterway container services or launch new services.

The agency is also taking applications for help in starting what would be the only regular U.S. coastal container shipping service, or short-sea service. There isn’t any funding appropriated to the program, but Marad hopes to tap the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program again in addition to other federal programs. The agency can also offer guidance to those looking to expand on or launch a service.

Marad has tried for years to create a network of marine highways with little success, said J. Stanley Payne, a principal at Summit Strategic Partners, a management and transportation consulting firm.

Such a service that would link U.S. ports requires U.S.-built ships, a stipulation of a key U.S. maritime law known as the Jones Act, a high cost for shipowners. That and operating the vessels with higher-cost American crews, also stipulated by the Jones Act, have generally outweighed benefits, such as avoiding highway and terminal gate congestion. A scarcity of viable entrepreneurs and a lack of credible market data also hobbles marine highway services, according to a Marad-funded study released in April.

“The bottom line is that there has to be an overriding reason to change the way freight moves in this country — short-sea shipping, after all the studies, hasn’t provided one,” said Payne, who has held leadership positions at the Virginia Port Authority and the Canaveral Port Authority.

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Stan Payne for JOC

Stan Payne comments on “The Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014”

Even if the current bill delivers on its goal to provide more equity to so-called donor ports, don’t expect the major West Coast ports to let up on their effort to get a larger share of the harbor maintenance taxes they collect back for harbor work, said J. Stanley “Stan” Payne, a principal at Summit Strategic Partners, a management and transportation consulting firm. Donor ports are defined as those that have collected at least $15 million in HMT dollars annually, received less than 25 percent of their collected HMT back in the last five fiscal years and handled more than 2 million TEUs in fiscal 2012. Donor ports, including Long Beach, Los Angeles and Seattle, have argued that the current funding mechanism allows competitors to benefit from their business.

This is feel-good legislation, but the reality is everyone wants a bigger slice, and the question is whether there is going to be enough to go around.

The catch is that ports that take that path aren’t guaranteed to get federal money, potentially leaving states, port authorities and, ultimately, taxpayers on the hook for millions of dollars, Payne said. The larger issue is how Congress is going to fund the hundreds of millions of dollars East Coast ports need to deepen their harbor so they can handle the larger ships soon-to-be-able to pass through the expanded Panama Canal in early 2016, he said. The current bill authorizes about $2 billion worth of port projects, including harbor deepening work at the ports of Jacksonville and Savannah. But it will be up to congressional appropriators to determine how much Uncle Sam kicks in and how much states, cities and port authorities will have to fund.
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Stan Payne for Spacecoast Business

A Candid Conversation with Canaveral Port Authority CEO Stan Payne

…in regions like the Space Coast, there are anchor business entities that allow others to exist. For Brevard County, one that is near the top is Port Canaveral, with its burgeoning cruise business, tank farm supplying metro Orlando and proposed cargo industry. Thanks largely to the leadership and vision of Stan Payne, last year’s SCB Business Leader of the Year, Port Canaveral continues to thrive.

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coversSCBDec11final-1Stan Payne: 2011 Business Leader of the Year

When he came to Port Canaveral there were two main problems that he saw had to be addressed. First, was the overlap between the elected board and the Port’s staff. Payne recalled, “From the outset I told them I would not take the job unless everyone acknowledged there is a bright line of separation between the staff or day-to-day operations and the Commission.” However he confided, “Not long after accepting the job I called my wife and let her know it wasn’t working out. I felt there was something fundamentally wrong with the way the Port was being run.” He told her, “I don’t fit in.

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Original Magazine Layout:
2011 Business Leader of the Year



Stan Payne Guides Port Canaveral to Impressive Growth

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Since he took the helm as CEO of Port Canaveral, Stan has been the driving force behind what has become an economic juggernaut on the Space Coast. Conservative estimates are that the Port brings a half billion dollars into the local economy every year. Though he once referred to it as, “The Little Port that Could,” the impressive growth, both in the burgeoning cruise ship industry and in cargo has caught international attention.

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Former Canaveral Port Authority CEO Stan Payne Discusses the Cruise Business and the Future of Port Canaveral.

Matt Reed with Stan Payne in which Payne also talks about his departure in March, 2013.


FLORIDATODAY

Payne Discusses Positive Economic Impact Study for Port Canaveral

Discussion of the Economic Impact Study for Port Canaveral and the achievements for long-term positive economic impact for the Canaveral area.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRpMnk_Doi0


Stan Payne-SCB-Bigger Ships Better BusinessBigger Ships, Better Business

Payne & the Port on Cruise Control – Port Canaveral Continues Stimulating Local Economy

Six years after taking the position of chief executive of the Canaveral Port Authority, the port’s numbers are looking excellent, despite an economy that is less than that. The port is growing: Last year, 3.5 million cruise passengers traveled through Port Canaveral, a million people more than used it in 2008, according to statistics from the Canaveral Port Authority. New ships have arrived, with more on the way. Cargo figures are on the rise. Construction and improvement projects continue.
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Original Magazine Layout:
SCB Bigger Ships 2010


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Payne 1-on-1

Leadership: One-on-One with Stan Payne

A candid conversation with Canaveral Port Authority CEO and SpaceCoast Business 2011 Business Leader of the Year.

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k9

K9 Team First in Nation Dedicated to Cruise Port

PORT CANAVERAL, Fla., (Sept. 9, 2011) – From left, Port Canaveral CEO J. Stanley “Stan” Payne; Orlando Sanford Airport Police Chief Bryant Garrett; Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Federal Security Director John Daly; and Port Canaveral Police Chief Joe Hellebrand. Port Canaveral became the first dedicated seaport in nation to get its own canine teams for bomb detection. The two K9 teams at Port Canaveral also will work in conjunction with a newly deployed team at Orlando Sanford International Airport, the first such partnership in the nation.

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